Project EduBat Activities and Curriculum

QUICK AND FUN ACTIVITIES FOR ALL AGES

Bat Hat
CLICK HERE for a template to make your very own bat hat.  The hat is arguably the most influential accessory in a well-dressed person’s arsenal.  Now is the time to introduce bats into your fashion wardrobe.  Your bat hat should be worn with confidence. Make the hat your own. Don’t be timid!  Great for people of all ages.

Big-eared Bat Finger Puppet
CLICK HERE for for a Big-eared bat finger puppet. Finger puppets are a childhood favorite. They transform children into storytellers, as well as offer a fun and educational craft project. We invite you to use our finger puppet as a way to allow kids to explore the wonders of a bat! 

Connect-the-Dots Activity Sheet
CLICK HERE for a Connect-the-Dots activity sheet featuring a little brown bat peeking out of its summer home in a standing dead tree.  You can complete the image (and practice counting numbers) by connecting the dots from 1 to 60.  When you have completed the image, discuss what habitat components are visible in the completed picture.

Fun at Your Fingertips Game
CLICK HERE for an easy to construct game that can be taken anywhere.  Challenge your friends and family to answer important questions about bats and see how well they can do.  Correct answers are available for anyone who struggles.  With this fun game, you can teach people about bats in the classroom, hallway, park, bus ride, well, anywhere!

Little Brown Bat Cutout
CLICK HERE for a little brown bat cutout.  The little brown bat is found throughout much of the United States and Canada.  This once common species is threatened by a new disease, White-Nose Syndrome.  This little bat has earned the nickname, “best bug killer in the world,” because it can catch so many insects.  Learn more about this bat while completing this fun activity.  The final bat can be hung on walls or from the ceiling!

Virginia Big-Eared Bat Cutout
CLICK HERE for a Virginia big-eared bat cutout.  Learn some interesting facts about this federally endangered species while you complete a fun craft project.  The final bat can be hung on walls or from the ceiling!


ELEMENTARY STUDENTS

Caves and Bats Rock!
CLICK HERE for an 18-page booklet from Project EduBat that includes activities and coloring pages for elementary students. 

Little Brown Bat – What’s Your Habitat?
CLICK HERE for an awesome lesson about the habitat needs of animals.  Students will read and/or listen to a story about a boy and a little brown bat.  Students will identify what little brown bats need to survive (food, water, shelter, and space) and describe/draw a picture of each of the components of the bat’s habitat. They will also describe characters in the story and answer questions to demonstrate their understanding.
CLICK HERE for a large illustration of Billy the Boy
CLICK HERE for a large illustration of Billy the Little Brown Bat
CLICK HERE for a large illustration of Beatrice, the pregnant Little Brown Bat
CLICK HERE for a large illustration of Eddie the Earthworm
CLICK HERE for a large illustration of the Tree Swallow Family
CLICK HERE for a large illustration of the Priscilla the Newborn Bat Pup


MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS

Calculate the Value of Bats -- New Update with Real-World Data
CLICK HERE for pdf file
There are many reasons for students to care about bats. They are fascinating and beautiful animals. In this activity, students will use math skills to learn about the ecological and economic impacts of bats. Students will also use communication skills to convey the importance of bats to our economy and natural world and the potential effects of White-Nose Syndrome.


HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AND ADULTS (with a variation for younger students)

Heroes of the Night Sky
CLICK HERE for a lesson in which students gather information on various organizations dedicated to bat conservation based upon their own interests; explore the purposes of these organizations; research their successes; and design their own bat conservation organization. This will require students to work collaboratively to develop goals, a mission statement, logo, and strategy for achieving success for their newly created organization. This activity focuses on language arts.

How Do I Compare to a Bat?
CLICK HERE for West Coast species
CLICK HERE for East Coast species
Children can learn a great deal about bats and themselves by comparing various aspects of their anatomy, physiology, and behavior. In this activity, children take their own measurements and compare them to those of two bat species found in the Western United States, canyon bat and big brown bat.

Working the Night Shift – Biometric Clues
CLICK HERE for West Coast species
CLICK HERE for East Coast species
Students will learn and perform data collection techniques used in the field by bat biologists.  They will measure and weigh “bat models,” record data, and determine bat identification by using data collected, clue cards, and a dichotomous key. Students will also learn about White-Nose Syndrome and other threats to bats.

Large Clue Cards – Working the Night Shift
CLICK HERE for West Coast Bat Species Clue Cards to be used with Working the Night Shift – Biometric Clues
CLICK HERE for East Coast Bat Species Clue Cards to be used with Working the Night Shift – Biometric Clues

Biologists Work the Night Shift Researching Bats
CLICK HERE for a PowerPoint Presentation to use with Working the Night Shift – Biometric Clues
How do you think bat biologists can determine a bat’s species? If you were going to collect data on a bat, what information would you need to help you determine a bat’s species? What data would you collect? How would you collect the data?  Where would you go to collect your data?  A river?  A forest?  Your backyard?

Last Bat Standing – Protecting Threatened and Endangered Species
CLICK HERE for lesson. Students will explore changes in the environment that can disrupt an ecosystem and threaten the health and survival of wildlife populations. Students will begin the lesson by working through an already-developed simulation of the decline of the northern long-eared bat due to a single, isolated factor (White-Nose Syndrome). Students will then research a different threatened or endangered bat species (preferably from their local area) that is of conservation concern.  After completing their research, they will design a more accurate, complex model that considers the role of multiple factors, focusing on their selected bat species.

There’s a Fungus Among Us!
CLICK HERE for an activity in which students investigate how infectious diseases are spread, focusing on the disease White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), and the scientific methods used to investigate diseases. Students will simulate the interactions of bats in a cave when bats are in close proximity and may spread WNS fungal spores.  At the beginning of this activity, only one student will be infected with WNS.  By coming into physical contact with other “bats,” students will have the chance to test to see if they have been infected with WNS and observe how quickly the disease can spread.  Students will also interpret graphs to learn about doubling effects, exponential equations, and population growth curves.

Making a Bat Model
CLICK HERE for instructions
 If you do not have access to one of the Project EduBat trunks, you may want to make your own bat models for the activity, “Working the Night Shift – Biometric Clues.” These bat models are easy and fun to make.  Students will love working with these bats.

Making a Bat Wingspans
Wingspans are a great way to show the diversity that abounds in the bat world.  They can be used individually or sewn together on the largest wingspan – the large flying fox.  While most of the bats we have in the United States are small bats, flying foxes achieve a large size.  There are more than 1,300 species of bats and their wingspans vary from about seven inches to nearly six feet.  These wingspans can be used alone as an educational tool or with the following EduBat activities: Heroes of the Night Sky, How Do I Compare to a Bat, or Working the Night Shift.
CLICK HERE for instructions           
CLICK HERE for flying fox   
CLICK HERE for bumblebee bat 
CLICK HERE for big brown and northern long-eared          
CLICK HERE for greater bulldog        
CLICK HERE for hoary     
CLICK HERE for Mexican free-tailed